If you were expecting an uplifting road-trip comedy that lays its emphasis on strong family values, you're better off looking elsewhere.

David Clark (Sudeikis) is a middle-aged, small-time pot dealer who's more than content in his seemingly stress-free life, selling Cannabis to the good people of Denver. Unfortunately, his tranquil existence soon takes a turn for the worse, when he valiantly attempts to help his geeky teenage neighbour, Kenny Rossmore (Poulter), rescue runaway teen, Casey Mathis (Roberts), from a group of street thugs.

Unfortunately, the hapless David loses his stash and money in the process, which lands him in a whole load of trouble with his wacko boss and pot distributor, Brad Gurdlinger (Helms). In order to repay his debt, David is ordered to smuggle a shipment of marijuana from Mexico to the U.S. The stakes are raised further; David will not only save his neck, but will also make an extra $100,000 on the side.

In figuring out how best to approach this misadventure waiting to happen, he is inspired by a chance encounter to pose as a family man – with a family he doesn't have.

David hires Kenny and Casey to play his kids and recently retired stripper, Rose O'Reilly (Aniston), to pose as his wife; together, the four misfits take to the road as bogus family, the Millers.

First and foremost, the casting is what breathes life into this comedy and audience shouldn't be discouraged by the presence of Aniston, despite a recent string of poor comedic turns. The former Friends actress, who continues to search for that one defining Hollywood role, is surprisingly edgy and delivers an all-around likeable performance. The same can be said for her co-star Sudeikis, whose trademark goofball charm is responsible for the majority of the story's laughs.

Said laughs come courtesy of isolated, zappy one-liners that are often of sexual or scatological nature. Under the direction of Rawson Marshall Thurber, the jokes are of acquired tastes – tastes that seem to be very en vogue in Hollywood right now, thanks to the likes of producer Judd Apatow, actors such as Vince Vaughn and the endless stream of Saturday Night alumni.

Taking a leaf out of the book of TV show, Weeds, We're the Millers is far from innocent, and despite its shortcomings and predictability, there's something sweet, likeable and relatable in its disposition. It's an easy watch whose familiarities and truisms actually work in its favour.