Fast action sequences and blowing things up are what the Hollywood filmmaker veteran, Michael Bay, knows best. His work on the Transformers film series almost came to an end back in 2011 when he himself announced that Dark of the Moon will be his third and final film in the series, only to be sucked back in by Age of Extinction.

Several years have passed since the Battle of Chicago where the Autobots battled the Decepticons. In order to ensure that the catastrophe never happens again, government agent, Harold Attinger (Grammer), has assigned tech guru, Joshua Joyce (Tucci), to destroy and deconstruct all of the remaining Transformers in order to create new robots that serve the US military.

Attinger recruits a black ops team led by James Savoy (Welliver) to hunt down the remaining transformers in hiding, with the help of Lockdown (voiced by Ryan); a Transformer that tracks and kills oits own kind.

Meanwhile, Cade Yeager (Wahlberg) - a Texas mechanic and protective father of a young and restless teenage daughter, Tessa (Peltz) - comes across an old truck that has been brought into his shop. The truck is revealed to be the Autobot leader, Optimus Prime, in disguise, but his emergence brings the unwanted attention of Attinger.

Like the rest of the series, Age of Extinction is riddled with giant plot holes, underwritten characters and a thinly-scripted storyline that has been stretched out to nearly three hours. Sure, there are plenty of explosions to go around and if anything, at least Michael Bay's mastered use of CGI - and his skilful eye for angles and backdrops - contributes to the experience. If you are a true Transformers fan, there is very little chance you will be disappointed with what you see.

As the new face of the series, Wahlberg seems committed and physically prepared for the role, but, regardless of his readiness and obvious eagerness to be a part of yet another Bay production – see Pain & Gain - he does get a little lost in the process. As his rebellious teenage daughter, Peltz fails to portray any sincere emotion, while Tucci seems to be the only one who offers any real charisma to his otherwise cartoonish role of a nutty professor.

Overall, the latest – and hopefully the last - addition to the now already exhausted franchise is long, loud and explosive and is probably best described as an unmemorable and an unchallenging action flick. No more Mr. Bay; we beg you.