Writer-director Joss Whedon has sure come a long way since his humble superhero beginnings with TV shows such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Firefly. His entry to the cinematic world of Marvel Comic Universe began with the 2012's Avengers – a movie that many claim to be one of the best comic-book movies ever – and it continues with its 2015 follow-up, Age of Ultron; an exciting but a slightly-inferior sequel that, despite its hiccups, will still manage to draw in the masses.

Having successfully defeated the mighty-villain Loki, the Avengers have gathered together to put a stop to the Hydra leader, Baron Wolfgang von Strucker (Kretschmann), and his latest experimental efforts.

See, von Strucker has been testing Loki's powerful sceptre on a couple of twins, the super-fast, Pietro (Taylor-Johnson) – a.k.a Quiksilver – and the telekinetic, Wanda Maximoff (Olsen) – a.k.a Scarlet Witch, who have been tasked to go after Stark. However, the Avengers manage to defeat the enemy forces and Thor is able to return Loki's sceptre back to Asgard.

After managing to enjoy a rare moment of peace and quiet, the Avengers soon get a troubling wake-up call with the arrival of Ultron (voiced by Spader); a gigantic robot - powered by Stark's unsuccessful dig into the world of AI - and an entity determined to destroy the Avengers and wipe out the humankind from the face of the world.

There's a troubling and occasionally jarring sense of melodrama surrounding Joss Whedon's latest Avengers adventure and, with two more planned, this entry seems like more of a vehicle to advance the Marvel Cinematic Universe, leaving it feeling a little hollow. Nevertheless, Age of Ultron is still an exciting addition and the fans will find plenty here to love; exciting battle sequences, super-cool special effects, plenty of drama and even a new villain. Additionally, the performances – especially of those by Renner and Johansson whose characters get a little bit more of the limelight this time around – gives the MCU much more dept and both Olsen and Taylor-Johnson as the supernatural twins, managed to hold their own. 

However, as thrilling as all that may be, the plot feel still feels like a filler for what's to come and the tone wavers in an awkward position between light, snappy wit and an inflated sense of drama, from which the villanous Ultron suffers most. Age of Ultron is not as exciting as its predecessor, but that doesn't mean it won't deliver at the Box Office.