Characterised by the same brand of implausibility and outrageously absurd action set-ups that made the series so popular, the laws of physics are once again defied by the Fast & Furious crew who return to the big screen with another surprisingly entertaining instalment to the fast-paced film franchise with their long-awaited and bitter-sweet sequel, Furious 7.

The appointment of James Wan to direct initially turned heads, but despite the horror director's lack of experience with the action genre, he delivers a film that will please loyalists.

The story picks up not long after the events of the previous film, with Dominic 'Dom' Toretto (Diesel), Brian (Walker) and the rest of the crew now living a relatively peaceful and uneventful life in Los Angeles.

It's only when the revenge-seeking Deckard Shaw (Statham) comes knocking that jolts them out of their seemingly humdrum, routine lives and they're approached by the shady Mr. Nobody (Russell) with a deal that will set Dom and co. up for a showdown with notorious hacker, Ramsey (Emmanuel).

There's little freshness or innovation about the set-up, but then the plot has never really been much of a concern for the franchise. The story – which has a little bit of a James Bond-esque espionage feel this time around – is crazier and sillier as the minutes go by with the gaps in narrative and logic unapologetically compensated for with a heavy dose of adrenaline-filled action. One particular air-drop scene stands out, while the Abu Dhabi backdrop provides a fittingly over-the-top setting for proceedings.

The death of Paul Walker halfway through the production naturally put a serious strain on everyone involved and it was a question whether the entire movie will be scrapped as a result. Luckily, with the help from Walker's two brothers – who stood in as body and stunt doubles – clever CGI tricks and the heartfelt performances from the entire crew – including a scene-stealing performance from Kurt Russell - Furious 7 provides a touching send-off to the Walker.